If you hate to exercise the last thing you want to do are exercises that are 1) boring and 2) don't really do much for you.  That's why we're asking some top trainers and coaches to share their absolute favorite move ever for beginners (or the one they're just really digging right now).

Natalie Jill is a licensed master sports nutritionist, functional fitness trainer, and creator of the "Rev-4: Rev It Up" DVD and "7-Day Jump Start" program.

Name of Move: Stability Ball Hamstring Curls

Why She Loves It: "This move addresses the 'butt-thigh' as I like to call it--that area between your glutes [butt] and your hamstrings [back of upper legs]," says Natalie. "Although you can’t spot-reduce that area, you can work to develop the muscles in your glutes and hamstrings, which will help to dramatically change the appearance of this area." She adds that "this is a pretty functionally-friendly fit move, so as long as you are willing and able to work out you can give this move a try."

How to Do It: Lying on your back, place your legs up on the stability ball. Using your hamstrings, slowly curl your heels toward your face, dragging the ball forward while lifting your hips up into a bridge. Squeeze your glutes as you do this and keep your core/low back/abdominals tight.

Start here, finding your balance on the ball before you start the curl.

Start here, finding your balance on the ball before you start the curl.

Lift your butt up as much as you're able (it may not be a lot to start, and that's fine). You should feel this move in the backs of your upper legs (hamstrings) and in your butt. Try to keep your head and neck as relaxed as possible. Pressing your hands into the ground at your sides can help you maintain balance and lift.

Lift your butt up as much as you're able (it may not be a lot to start, and that's fine). You should feel this move in the backs of your upper legs (hamstrings) and in your butt. Try to keep your head and neck as relaxed as possible. Pressing your hands into the ground at your sides can help you maintain balance and lift.

Roll the ball back out, keeping the curls slow and controlled. If you're a beginner start with one or two curls, working up to as many as 12 to 15. Do as many as you can while keeping good form.


You don't need to do a lot of these Stability Ball Hamstrings Curls to get the benefit.

You don't need to do a lot of these Stability Ball Hamstrings Curls to get the benefit.


Photos: Noel Daganta